Prof. Eleanor Casella’s reference Kimberley Points

This morning I paid another visit to the Manchester Museum and Gareth Frier was kind enough to dig out their Kimberley Points collection for me. My aim was to compare and contrast two of my own points with the museum originals. The two points in question are produced from the same piece of period glass bottle (see here and here) and are headed for Eleanor Casella’s teaching collection. Long story short: one of my points is a good replication, the other less so.

KP1

The above right is the ‘less so’. The point on the left is the original and as can be seen, it is much more refined in its retouch. They are keeping their retoucher much sharper, as it states in the texts, and it is interesting to see what that actually means in practice. Consequently, the original sits flatter on the paper in spite of its twisted longitudinal profile, and I now think that it is this flatness that allows more detailed edge serrations. I went in thinking it was edge angle that would be different, but it is flatness, which leads to a reduced edge angle and ultimately thinner margins that can be serrated. I have left my version with Eleanor as I said I would drop it off today, but I would like to continue flaking in order to flatten it, if she wants me to.KP2

I am pleased with this second one. To all intents and purposes it fits the Kimberley Point criteria. The point on the left is the original and it has been made from a thick (at least 7mm) piece of glass and completely flaked on both surfaces. Mine on the other hand is made from the side panel of a glass bottle and has some original ventral surface left. This is true for almost all the other pieces, though usually to a lesser degree. I have also left some original dorsal surface to keep the lettering because I like it, and other examples discussed had this. I am pleased to say that this piece would be at home in the box with all the other originals.

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