Fourth time lucky

Yesterday evening Nick Overton and myself had ourselves a marathon 4 hour knapping session. I was interested in making two more points from the remaining Camp Coffee preforms and whilst doing so we had some stimulating conversation about the nature of retouch. It has been a theme in this blog that I seem to struggle to replicate the character of the retouch seen on the museum pieces. By the time I got to my last point I think I recognised why. I produced my four points and as can be seen from the photographs below it has made a really nice narrative sequence. Finding the period material; using a stone to make the preforms; using the preforms to make the points.

nest of pointsNick is using a different Bombay Sapphire bottle glass and is focusing upon  getting a series of fully invasive removals on his first sweep. To achieve this he is taking very ‘flat’ removals off the surface of the glass by placing his pressure flaker close to the top of the platform and pushing straight in. He then uses his knee to provide the transverse force necessary to remove the flake, like this.  Although my pressure flaking method is different I am doing something similar, in that we are ending up with similar results. On my last point I started to place my pressure flaker lower on the platform and changed the angle of pressure. This allowed me to work in a more systematic and aggressive manner punching off the removals. I started to get concavity on both ventral and dorsal surfaces and the final point is more similar in character to the museum examples. I am chasing a characteristic method of applying retouch, which in turn produces a characteristic feel to the finished piece. I think the thicker glass allows this kind of work. I am pleased with my nest of points all from the one half bottle. I am really pleased with this punchy approach to flake removal. The next one I think will be an experiment in platforms and pressure flaker angles.

 

 

& Chicory Kimberley Point

And the process continues. I still do not like the Glasgow point, and all I can say really is that it doesn’t feel right. As so after playing with it for a while I decided to opt for an overtly plano-convex approach with my next attempt. The rationale behind this was to make the process simple. Rough out the shape by attacking one surface only. This would also create a platform all around the preform. I could then use this platform to punch out large flakes making the plano-convex cross section and giving the piece the characteristic look.

method

For this second point I selected another blank from the Camp Coffee bottle, this one from the ‘& Chicory’ section. In theory the plano-convex approach would leave on the lettering.

&

In practice, it didn’t. I like this point, although it is difficult to explain exactly why it looks and feels more correct. It is approximating a lens shaped profile, and I was able to be more confident in how I worked this piece. It may simply be that in plan this piece looks similar to the museum examples I have seen. All I can say is that I am pleased with it. The ‘&’ is a useful landmark to show how much material has been removed.

& point

Whilst it didn’t work out exactly as expected, I enjoyed the process of working through an idea. The emerging goal seems to be to get four points from the four blanks produced from the Patterson’s Coffee bottle. That would be a satisfying result 🙂

 

Glasgow Kimberley Point

bottle 2

After quartering the Camp Coffee bottle yesterday I roughed out the first Kimberley Point. This morning I finished it (I think).

glasgow point 1

The ASGO are useful landmarks for recognising how much material has been lost.

glasgow point 2

However, I am not quite sure if I like it. It is not quite plano-convex, and not quite lens shaped. This is partly an artefact of design as I was aiming to keep on some of the lettering. However it also doesn’t have the consistent deep invasive removals that have characterised the museum points I have seen. It does have some, especially forming the tip, but not enough to give the overall impression that the museum pieces do. Perhaps it is not finished. Perhaps I need to handle and play with it for a while to know. I am pleased with the serrated edges for which I used a flattened end of a number eight wire. I will report the results of my deliberations…soonish.

Karl Lee pressure flaking glass

This is a link to a short video of Karl Lee pressure flaking glass . It is of interest to me because it illustrates how he uses his knee “like a vice” to remove the flake. The large piece of glass was modern, and probably a table top. This is the end result.

karl point

Manchester, rain, three Kimberley Points.

Today has been miserable in Manchester, an ideal day for being sat behind a desk, sorting out all those jobs that need doing. I found myself in the backyard, in the rain. I have been inspired since my visit to the museum earlier in the week, and think I am getting it. Consequently, I took three points made previously and reworked them, or refined them to bring them more in line with the museum examples.

June 28.2

I know you shouldn’t have favourites, but it’s the middle one. Then the one on the right and then the one on the far left. I actually learned the most from working on the one on the far left, and then was able to apply that learning to the other two. Essentially my edge control is getting good. This is allowing me to get flatter points, and in turn serrate the margins more subtly.

MM

This is one of the museum examples with a broken tip, angled to show the degree of retouch. You can see how the flaking really penetrates up to half way in creating a ridge or spine.

fb version

This is my version. Shape and size and margins are all good. The needle like tip is needle like, the area to improve is fully invasive retouch. It needs to penetrate further in. I therefore need to take a leaf out of Nick Overton’s book and sort that out on my first pass, then bingo!

 

Prof. Eleanor Casella’s reference Kimberley Points

This morning I paid another visit to the Manchester Museum and Gareth Frier was kind enough to dig out their Kimberley Points collection for me. My aim was to compare and contrast two of my own points with the museum originals. The two points in question are produced from the same piece of period glass bottle (see here and here) and are headed for Eleanor Casella’s teaching collection. Long story short: one of my points is a good replication, the other less so.

KP1

The above right is the ‘less so’. The point on the left is the original and as can be seen, it is much more refined in its retouch. They are keeping their retoucher much sharper, as it states in the texts, and it is interesting to see what that actually means in practice. Consequently, the original sits flatter on the paper in spite of its twisted longitudinal profile, and I now think that it is this flatness that allows more detailed edge serrations. I went in thinking it was edge angle that would be different, but it is flatness, which leads to a reduced edge angle and ultimately thinner margins that can be serrated. I have left my version with Eleanor as I said I would drop it off today, but I would like to continue flaking in order to flatten it, if she wants me to.KP2

I am pleased with this second one. To all intents and purposes it fits the Kimberley Point criteria. The point on the left is the original and it has been made from a thick (at least 7mm) piece of glass and completely flaked on both surfaces. Mine on the other hand is made from the side panel of a glass bottle and has some original ventral surface left. This is true for almost all the other pieces, though usually to a lesser degree. I have also left some original dorsal surface to keep the lettering because I like it, and other examples discussed had this. I am pleased to say that this piece would be at home in the box with all the other originals.

A second point from the second preform.

9.6.17 1

I was more cautious with this one and it turned out longer. I tried to stick to my method, ventral first, then dorsal, then the point, however the angle of the edge face made me improvise a bit. I am pleased with the needle like point, and am going to arrange to go back into the Manchester Museum to compare and contrast. I think the key difference between mine and the actual points may be thickness and edge angle. Let’s see. 9-6-17-2.jpg

The next post will be about home made pressure flaking tools, as we have been innovating in our twice weekly knapping get-togethers.